Sequential art that doesn’t necessarily need to be funny.

Greetings frail meat puppets, tis I – Dinorobosaur – back from my intergalactic space travels.
Now, it’s been a fair few days since I last posted, due to the lack of effective Wifi out past the asteroid belts, so I thought I’d lead in with a light and delicious post about … um, lets see … how about I share with you some information about one of my favourite things?
No?
NO?!
NOOO!!! you say??
Well too bad fleshlings, in the grand pecking order of things giant dinorobosaurs are far, far above you wobbly two-legs, and as such today I will be teaching (read: plagiarising from the interwebs) you about the wonderful and beautiful realm of Comics.

At its simplest, a comic book is simply a series of words and pictures that are presented in a sequential manner to form a narrative, this narrative doesn’t need to funny – indeed many comics are very serious business, while others tell dramatic stories and horrific tales.

Traditionally occupying the fringes of pop culture, the comic book is actually a valuable historical text that comments on how young people and adults alike identify with cultural and political issues. As such, a comic book is much more than just a series of words and pictures with marginal cultural importance. Indeed, given its complex cultural and commercial role, a definition of “comic book” raises an amalgam of theoretical debates about sequence, narrative, image, text, genre, and art as well as its relation to other genres, such as children’s literature. At the very least, comic books can be seen as a result of pressures by artists and consumers as well as by the historical forces acting on both groups. Much more than just a form of entertainment for kids, comic books are a serious and sophisticated art form that both feeds off of and creates cultural formulas and historical constructs.

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P
ictured: Serious and sophisticated art.

Since the 1960s the comic book industry has been dominated by the two major publishers of superhero books—Marvel and Detective Comics (DC). DC’s official name for almost 50 years was National Periodical Publication; Marvel was known as Timely Comics from 1939 to about 1950, and then as Atlas Comics for much of the 1950s. Many comic book fans often use the concept of “ages” to distinguish periods of comic book history that share concerns, storytelling techniques, marketing strategies, styles of art and writing, and approach to genre conventions. These ages can roughly be distinguished as the Golden (1938-1956), Silver (1956-1971), Bronze (1971-1980), Iron (1980-1987), and Modern (1987-present)

1930-1950: Golden Age

Comic books blossomed into a distinct entertainment industry after 1938 when Jerome Siegal and Joseph Shuster created Superman, the initiator of the superhero genre that would remain the cornerstone of the comic book industry. When DC comics introduced Batman in 1939, it eventually pushed out the “crime” and “detective” stories from DC’s title. The popularity of the superhero in the 1930s led to the creation of other characters such as Wonder Woman, Captain America, The Flash, and the Green Lantern. Marvel comics introduced enduring characters such as the Human Torch and Captain America. In terms of style and technique, Will Eisner’s work on his masked detective series The Spirit adapted many film techniques to comic books and developed much of the storytelling grammar still used in comic books today. For example, unlike the short daily strips and fixed perspective of juvenile comics, Eisner’s “cinematic” storytelling unfolded stories over several pages, using a montage of light and sound, dynamic framing, and vibrant colors.

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If your not familiar with this picture, you should be ashamed of yourself.

World War II was a boon for the comic book, perhaps because it promoted two prevailing ideological visions of the time: New Deal-style social reform and WWII patriotism. The DC superhero comics tacitly stressed a common interest in public welfare and strong federal government. Marvel comics took up the cause of WWII patriotism in its creation of Captain America, showing Captain America punching Hitler in the face. In fact, the primary narrative convention of the Golden Age is the defense of the normal. But after WWII, the impetus driving the Golden Age fizzled, and the cancellation of Captain Marvel and Plastic Man (with the similar lighthearted approach to super heroics) effectively ended the Golden Age.

1956-1971: The Silver Age

After WWII, comic books lost readers and publishers alike due to lack of purpose, competition from television, as well as Senate investigations into the cultural influence of the comic book industry, particularly the influence of popular “horror” comic books. Perhaps most damaging to the comic book industry was Dr. Fredric Wertham’s book The Seduction of the Innocent which accused some comic books of corrupting the youth and inciting them to violence. In response to Wertham’s attacks, comic book companies created the Comics Code Authority as a way to self-police the industry and win back readers.

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This guy just didn’t understand that we can tell fact from fiction.

By the start of the 1960s, the industry showed further signs of recovery. Like the Golden Age, the Silver Age began with superhero comic books acting to convey the prevailing social ideology. But when that no longer appealed to audiences, the Silver Age comic book moved away from explicitly ideological texts. The superhero genre which had been used to build consensus and morale during WWII was now questioning America’s role as the world’s superpower, due largely in part to the public’s perception of the Vietnam War. Marvel comics further revolutionized the superhero by creating characters who had some kind of weakness or defect, such as the Hulk and Spiderman. They were persecuted and misunderstood outsiders and spoke directly to public disorientation. In response to DC’s Justice League of America, Marvel created the Fantastic Four. While these narratives still featured contests between good evil, those concepts are slightly complicated with the introduction of virtuous villains and reluctant, selfish, or bickering heroes. The end of the Silver Age can be marked by Steve Rogers’ abandonment of the Captain America identity as a reaction to the “Secret Empire,” a story line that was a fictionalized depiction of Watergate.

1971-1980: The Bronze Age

The Bronze Age is characterized by a shift from social issues to an emphasis on form and stylistic details. Comic books no longer looked through form to the ideals, values, and conflicts of society but began to look at the form itself. Motivated by persistent criticism that comic book art was not “great” art, comic book artists began to experiment with color and page display. While the new emphasis on art won critical acclaim, the industry experienced a marked decline in sales. This was due in large part to archaic distribution practices. Comic books were still largely carried by traditional newsstands, but these traditional comic book venues were rapidly being replaced by chain stores. In an attempt to revise its marketing structure, the comic book industry formed the Academy of Comic-Book Arts (ACBA) and later the Comic Guild in hopes of achieving, as Stan Lee (the creator of Spiderman) states, “for comic books what Academy Awards do for motion picture”. These associations also hoped to gain the respect from the American public that comic books industries had in France and Japan while at the same time providing comic book writers with more benefits and job security.

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Ever notice Spidermans villians were mostly animal based?
vulture, octopus, rhino, goblin – wait is a goblin an animal?

While comic book sales continued to decline, DC and Marvel turned to licensing out their characters to television for revenue. DC enjoyed profits from Saturday cartoons such as Superfriends and Batman as well as the Wonder Woman series. The Superman movie starring Christopher Reeve also provided DC with revenue. Marvel licensed the Incredible Hulk series starring Bill Bixby and authorized the animated Fantastic Four series. Marvel also bought the rights to print Star Wars comic books.

1980-1987: The Iron Age

The Iron Age extends the Bronze Age’s emphasis on form and embellishes it to the point where form itself becomes the “substance” or “content” of the work. Indeed, in a sophisticated interplay of postmodern intertextuality and self-reflexiveness, many comic book heroes, such as Frank Miller’s Daredevil, began to question their own heroism and often seemed to have a tenuous grasp on their own sanity. In fact, heroes seemed to be the subject of comic book stories rather than the means to tell a story. Soon the Iron Age hero began focused on his own mortality. In fact, the Iron Age witnessed the death of numerous superheroes, including Captain Marvel, Batman (at least figuratively), and Watchmen’s anti-hero Rorschach. Superman himself died in Louis Lane’s arms in 1992. And in a move that completely wiped out all stories pre-1986, DC rewrote the history of its universe in Crisis on Infinite Earths. Perhaps most emblematic of the death of the superhero is the Iron Age’s self-proclaimed greatest success: Spawn, a corpse. During the Iron Age, the comic book genre turned on itself and nearly dismantled its own genre conventions.

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Such a handsome and approachable super hero – and friendly too.

While comic book heroes may have been experiencing their own existential crises, comic book publishers earned greater profits than ever before by raising the cost of comic books, distributing them to specialized comic book retail outlets rather than newsstands on nonreturnable basis, and targeting the loyal fan base over causal mainstream readers. The increased influence of this specialized market on the production and distribution of comic books indicated the extent to which comic books had become, in large part, the niche of a slightly estranged subculture.

1987-Present: Modern Age

By the end of the 1980s, the comic book industry seemed interested in reconstructing the genre that nearly deconstructed itself by emphasizing continuity from the Golden and Silver ages and reconstructing the mission convention that broke down in the Iron Age. Perhaps most importantly, the comic book industry began marketing new issues of comic books, such as Spiderman and X-Men, as future collector items. In fact, during the 1990s comics became top collector items, only less popular than stamps and coins. Even though comic books in 1990s had a smaller audience than in previous eras, this audience was willing to buy more and pay more.

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With our powers combined! … wait, captain planet would be an interesting article – someone remind me later.

In a major symbolic event for the American Comic Book Industry, Marvel became the first comic book publisher to be listed on the New York Stock Exchange in 1991. Within just six months, an issue of Marvel’s X-Men sold a record 8.2 million copies.

So there we have it folks, a brief history of comics – and to think my father-unit thought they were a waste of paper!

Peace out hominids.

Dinorobosaur.

ps: I can’t help but notice these ponies are everywhere…

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Nu Zeelans Hero: Sir Edmund HIllary.

Greetings from New Zealand tiny flesh snacks, today I’m talking about Sir Edmund Hillary, our proud mountain man.  While he passed away back in 2008, I see his face almost every day.  Not because I’m a ghost whisperer but because he is on our five dollar note, he’s worthy enough to be on the hundred – but then again how many of us see the hundy note regularly? This way we see him in our change every time we go shopping.

Cha - Chiiiing.

Cha – Chiiiing.

We should all know he climbed Mt Everest a.k.a The Tallest Freaking Mountain in the World, but what else do we really know about him?
Well, his middle name was Percival, which makes him sound like one of King Arthurs knights and that’s pretty cool.

But there is a whole lot of things about Sir Ed that you don’t know about.  For example he was born waaay back in 1919, and followed his father’s footsteps after school and became a beekeeper. This summer job allowed him time to climb mountains in the winter.

As Hillary trekked away from his successful expedition up Nepal’s Mount Everest in 1953, a runner arrived bearing a letter addressed to “Sir Edmund Hillary KBE”. Hillary was reported to be somewhat peeved that someone had accepted a knighthood from Britain’s new queen on his behalf.

Ruggedly handsomely peeved.

Ruggedly handsomely peeved.

Many Kiwis affectionately call Hillary “Sir Ed” and believe his earthy directness and dry humour epitomised the best in their countrymen. On announcing news of Hillary’s death New Zealand Prime Minister described him as a “quintessential Kiwi”.  Hillary became the first living New Zealander to appear a bank note in 1990. The five dollar note pictures Hillary alongside Mount Cook/Aoraki, the highest mountain in New Zealand, and a Massey Ferguson tractor, the model he used, with minor adjustments, in his 1958 trek to the South Pole, the world’s first by motorised vehicle.

Just realised that he *is* a knight called Percival.  -mind = blown-

Just realised that he *is* a knight called Percival.
-mind = blown-

After Everest, Hillary led a number of expeditions. He and son Peter, also a mountaineer, became the first to introduce jetboats to India’s Ganges river during a 1977 expedition to find the great river’s source in the Himalayas. He returned many times to Nepal, dedicating his later years to improving life for people living in the mountains.

Edmund Hillary married Louise Mary Rose, in 1953. They had three children. He lost his wife in 1975. In 1989, he wedded June Mulgrew, the widow of his friend Peter Mulgrew. Peter Hillary, son of Edmund followed the footsteps of his father to reach Mount Everest in 1990.

Facts about the Everest Expedition.

He breasted Mount Ollivier in 1939, thus completing his first major climb. In 1951, he joined the British reconnaissance expedition to Everest. The expedition was led by Eric Shipton. British team led again by Eric Shipton attempted an expedition to mount Cho Oyu, which lies in the Himalayas and is 20 km west of Mount Everest, at the border between China and Nepal. Edmund Hillary accompanied by George Lowe was a part of that team. That expedition failed. Later, Hillary and Lowe were invited for the approved British summit to the Everest in 1953.

Hillary strongly wanted to climb with his friend Lowe, but the two teams selected were one of Tom Bourdillon and Charles Evans and other of Hillary and Tensing. The expedition began in March 1953 at the base camp. Its final camp was set up at South Col, at 25,900 feet.. Once a mountaineer is on the South Col, he is said to have entered the ‘death zone’. Edmund Hillary and Tensing were detained there for two days due to harsh weather conditions. They reached a height of 27,900 feet on May 28.

On the next day, the pair set off for their final ascension to mount Everest! They reached Everest at 11.30 a.m. They were on top of the world at a height of 29,028 feet, feeling ‘on top of the world’ indeed! There they spent only 15 minutes. Hillary took Tensing’s picture. Tensing, not knowing how to use a camera, could not take Hillary’s photograph. It a little ironic that there exists no photograph of Hillary on mount Everest!

It's cool, Nz'ers are easy going. You're forgiven.

It’s cool, Nz’ers are easy going. You’re forgiven.

There descent on the snow-covered track had to be made carefully. After meeting Lowe, Edmund exclaimed, “Well, George, we knocked the bastard off”.

Feats of Edmund Hillary after the Everest Summit.

Hillary surmounted ten other Himalayan peaks. He headed a team to the South Pole. It was for the first time ever that a team of people had reached the South Pole on motorcycles. Later, he led a jet boat journey from the mouth of the Ganges River to its source. It was called ‘Ocean to Sky’.

He participated in the 1975 General Elections. He was appointed as the New Zealand High Commissioner to India in 1985. He, along with Neil Armstrong, landed on the North Pole in 1985. He boasts of being the first man to reach both the poles and also conquer Mount Everest. Many organizations and streets in New Zealand have been named after Edmund Hillary. In 1992, he was featured on the $5 note. He urged to have mount Cook on the background of his picture on the note. He was the first person who was showcased on a note when alive. Nepalese Government awarded Hillary, their citizenship. Again he was a first foreigner receiving this honor from the Nepal Government. ‘Padma Vibhushan’ is the second highest civilian honor of India. Hillary was given this honor by the Indian Government, in 2008.

Edmund Hillary’s Demise.

Hillary expired on 11th January 2008 at the Auckland City Hospital. New Zealand Prime Minister, Helen Clark called Hillary a ‘quintessential Kiwi’ described his death as a profound loss to New Zealand. In a tribute to Hillary, Claire Harvey wrote, “Sir Ed was everything a good bastard ought to be – modest and humorous, brave and compassionate, and just grouchy enough to remind us he never sought, nor particularly enjoyed, adulation”.

So man of mountains, our icon, we salute thee.

Peace out.

Dinorobosaur.

"Well, Georgy Pie, we knocked the bastard off".

“Well, Georgy Pie, we knocked the bastard off”.

This is the closest Pony equivalent I could find.

 

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balloons

Hello small mammals, Like all semi robotical dinosaurs, I love me some balloons.  They are awesome and no party is a true party without them.  They come in many colours and shapes and sizes, but what do we really know about them?

What mysteries do you hold?

What mysteries do you hold?

The first rubber balloons were made by Professor Michael Faraday in 1824 for use in his experiments with hydrogen at the Royal Institution in London.Faraday made his balloons by cutting round two sheets of rubber laid together and pressing the edges together. The tacky rubber welded automatically, and the inside of the balloon was rubbed with flour to prevent the opposing surfaces joining together.

Silver metalised balloons were first developed for the New York City ballet in the late 1970s, The concept and technology for the ‘metalisation’ of plastic sheeting that has given us foil balloons comes directly out of the NASA Space Mission. They are made of nylon sheet, coated on one side with polyethylene and metallised on the other. They are made with the sole purpose of withholding gas easier and longer than a latex balloon. 

Here are some balloon records made by people with nothing better to do 

Angel Barcia kept two balloons aloft using only his head for a total of 45 bouncesA total of 552 people blew up balloons and then popped them by sitting on them. They set the record during Thirst Youth Convention in Erie, Pennsylvania.

Greg Arrigoni used 1434 Qualtex balloons to build a balloon arch. The balloons were three feet in diameter. The arch measured 600 feet wide and 340 feet tall.

An attendee at iD Tech Camps Macalester College inflated a balloon with his nose until it popped in 17.97 seconds.

Nicholas Moallem kept a static balloon attached to his head for 41 minutes, 10.42 seconds while dancing like a chicken. 

Darryl Learie fit seven inflated balloons inside an eighth inflated balloon in a Russian Doll format.

Ryan Bonifas put 17 golf balls inside an inflated latex party balloon.

Darryl Learie completed 30 push-ups on two inflated balloons.

Brian Pankey hit a punch balloon with his fist 167 times in one minute.

Darryl Learie popped an inflated balloon inside two more inflated balloons without popping either of the outside balloons. 

Brian Pankey kept a balloon aloft using only his head for a total of 19 bounces while simultaneously juggling three clubs.

Doug McManaman fired five shots backwards using a mirror, hitting five balloons from 65 yards away.

Darryl Learie inflated 1,000 latex party balloons in 231 minutes and 48 seconds — just under four hours.

From this I can judge that Darryl Learie has too much time on his hands, In fact check out http://darryl-learie.wikispaces.com/ to see exactly how much time.

Peace out for now hominids.

Dinorobosaur.

There is a pony version of everything ever.

There is a pony version of everything ever.

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Optimal use of your Kenworth K100.

Hey hey flesh snacks, tis I – Dinorobosaur – and tonight I am going to show you the greatest robot of all time.

Thats right, Optimus Prime, leader of the Autobots. As a child from the Eighties Optimus was a role model for all that was good and noble, showing us to protect the innocent from the evil strong. The first generation Optimus Prime transforms into a Kenworth K100 cab over truck, and this is the image of Mr Prime that I will always carry in my heart. This version came with a cab that would appear out of nowhere and also transformed into a combat deck, complete with a scouting buggy, battle station and a selection of cannons and lasers (because this was the eighties, cannons and lasers took up roughly 80% of all the airtime children watched).

My childhood effectively ended when the Transformers animated movie came out, as Optimus fell to Megatron in one of the greatest fight scenes of my generation.

But the Kenworth Prime was only the beginning of the road ahead for Optimus Prime.
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This isn’t even my Final Form!!*

Throughout the many t.v series, comics and movie adaptions he has rolled out in many different designs. He started his life as a wee dock worker named Orion Pax before being rebuilt into his more recognisable form. From the First Generation, to Beastwars and Transformers Animated, through to the Japan series and fan made follies and successes, Optimus has had some awesome and bewildering forms. There is even an alternate reality (Transformers: Timelines) where the Autobots are evil, and Optimus is not only a badass, but an Evil Badass.  Here is a pleasant visual montage to titillate your eyeballs.
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Classic Prime is Classic*

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*Dat Chest*

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*I think the entire beastwars was only created so
that they could use the name Optimus Primal*

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*What is this, I don’t even…*

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*Best Crossover EVER*

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*Cuteness reactor … overloading…*

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*Not too shabby*

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*Why would anyone pick a different piece?*

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*Evil Prime looks like a BADASS!*

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*Whoever built this is my hero*

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*GUN HAND! GUUUUUUUN HAAAAAAND!!!!*

Optimus has made a giant robotic footprint on our planet in the following ways:

During the promotion of the Transformers films, Optimus Prime appeared in several commercials. Optimus Prime, along with other Transformers, were featured in several commercials for General Motors. A commercial for the Discovery Channel featured Optimus Prime singing part of a promotional song.

Optimus also appeared on the Late Show with David Letterman, giving “The Top Ten Things That Sound Cool When Spoken by a Giant Robot”.

Optimus Prime is one of the Autobots featured in Transformers: The Ride at Universal Studios theme parks. In the ride, Optimus fends off against the invading Decepticons at N.E.S.T. headquarters while telling Evac to escape with the AllSpark shard. He battles Megatron throughout the ride until Megatron is killed by Evac. Optimus then congratulates Evac and the riders for protecting the AllSpark.

A forty foot (12.2 m) statue of Optimus Prime exists in Kunming city in Yunnan Province, China. It is located near several automobile dealerships.

In the South Park trilogy “Imaginationland”, Optimus Prime is one of the warriors who fight on the side of the good imaginary characters.

A figure in the form of Optimus Prime appears in a pattern of windows and other markings on the background of the game Assassin’s Creed.

Optimus Prime was parodied in several episodes of Robot Chicken. He was voiced by character actor Abraham Benrubi.

In 2003, a United States National Guardsman legally changed his name to “Optimus Prime” on his 30th birthday.

Sheldon Comics includes several comics either containing Optimus Prime toys or referencing the Optimus Prime.

In conjunction with the release of the 2007 live-action film, Hasbro released a Mr. Potato Head version of Optimus Prime named Optimash Prime and a transforming plush toy called Softimus Prime.

Optimus Prime is mentioned in the Lemon Demon song “The Ultimate Showdown of Ultimate Destiny”.

In the 2006 comedy movie Clerks II, Elias states that his screen name is Optimus Prime.

A Canadian military operation in Afghanistan was code-named “Op Timis Preem”.

British Prime Minister Gordon Brown told the news media that, “Optimus Prime could solve the current problems in our world.”

At a gathering of Jewish people near the end of the Family Guy episode “When You Wish Upon a Weinstein”, Peter Griffin finds out that Optimus Prime is Jewish when the robot arrives at the gathering in vehicle form and transforms, complete with a yarmulke and Tallit.

Legacy Brewing Company from Reading, Pennsylvania, now out of business, made an Imperial India Pale Ale called “Hoptimus Prime”. The beverage also appeared in the 2008 Xbox 360 game Fable II.

Optimus Prime is referred to in a verse from the song “Get at Me Dog” by DMX

Optimus Prime was featured in Seth MacFarlane’s Cavalcade of Cartoon Comedy in a short cartoon in which Prime was having sex with a human female in robot mode. When he reached climax, he transformed into vehicle mode and crushing his partner.

In 2011, James Reimer, the rookie goaltender of the Toronto Maple Leafs hockey team, has been dubbed “Optimus Reim” for his positive demeanour and machine-like ability to stop pucks.

Optimus Prime makes a few appearances in Cartoon Network’s Mad (in both his Generation 1 and Movie forms).

That is quite a big footprint, and I’m sure my list only comprises of a small section of one of the toes, so as an extra after Prime mint here is something delicious:

So goodnight wee mammals, and remember to dream of Optimus tonight.

Peace out.

Dinorobosaur.

Oh, and of course – here is the Pony.
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*There is always a Pony*

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NO REGERTS!!!!

Hello again young mammals, I have been away lately catching up on my reading and video games, and dealing with the dreaded birthday avalanche of many family members.  While this has been very enjoyable, all in all I feel as though I have neglected you, and I feel bad for that – so in reparation of my thoughtlessness to you, I bring to your attention a light and humorous post today.

Tattoos.  Many of us have them, most of us even like the ones we have. (excepting of course your ex partners name in a heart on your inner thigh, It’s getting harder and harder to find new girlfriends called Morag)
Many people get unique and meaningful tattoos, beautiful works of art that advance the medium of tattooing.

And then there are these people.

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All these people have absolutely no regrets, until one of their more literate friends explain to them, and then they are filled with ALL THE REGERTS!!!!.  Some people blame the tattooist – but I lay all the blame squarely on the customer.  If you are about to get a permanent tattoo inked into your flesh, you better check the spelling before the needle goes in.

Now I may be a dinorobosaur, out of touch with what you mammals get up to, but in this case I’m judging you harshly.

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Oh, well in that case, Juge away god, Juge away.

Peace out for now fleshlings.

Dinorobosaur.

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Stop playing with my Delirium.

Hello fleshy bipeds. Armageddon is happening – not revelation styles, but geekavation styles. For those of you from the States, Japan and any other big or culturally awesome places Armageddon is the New Zealand version of Comic Con – It’s not as big as we would like it, but it’s been building team over the years and as such the Cosplaying population is starting to make a bigger and better scene.

Starwars - big in cosplay.

Starwars – big in cosplay.

That rabbit is badass.

That rabbit is badass.

ANIME!

ANIME!

I'm not sure id they are cosplayers or just lost on the way to a gig.

I’m not sure id they are cosplayers or just lost on the way to a gig.

I have no idea why they got their photos taken.

I have no idea why they got their photos taken.

No you cannot deliver my baby.

No you cannot deliver my baby.

A tale as old as time.

A tale as old as time.

Wait a minute, he's too tall to be a Dwarf.

Wait a minute, he’s too tall to be a Dwarf.

Now I love me some Armageddon  because I’m a big fan of comics, fantasy and scifi, cool trinkets, posters and whatsits, as well as the guest panels, speakers and sneak peeks into new work. And the cosplayers. They mostly go to a lot of effort and you can really admire the work they have out in.

Some people put less effort into it than others.

Some people put less effort into it than others.

Many cosplayers dress and act as a character from video games, movies and comics – although many also dress as characters from books and tv. The Avengers are popular, because it can be awesome.

These guys are rocking it from the Philippines

These guys are rocking it from the Philippines

"Shirts make me angry, you wouldn't like me when I'm ANGRY!!!!!"

“Shirts make me angry, you wouldn’t like me when I’m ANGRY!!!!!”

One of the coolest Cosplay I have seen, is that of Delerium, one of the Endless from Neil Gaimanns most awesomest series Sandman. The cool thing about her is that there are soo many different ways you can dress that will fit the character, so we get people like this.

"Bubbles, My bubblesmybubblemybubbles"

“Bubbles, My bubblesmybubblemybubbles”

10 out of 10 for commitment.

10 out of 10 for commitment.

The fish is an intregral part of the costume.

The fish is an intregral part of the costume.

Daaawwwwwww...

Daaawwwwwww…

For those of you unfamiliar with the work, here is a little info bout the character. Delirium, known to the Greek culture as Maniae, is the youngest of the Endless, yet still older than the rest of existence. She is usually quite short, and thin, and looks no older than a fourteen-year-old human girl. One of her eyes is silver-flecked blue, and the other is green. Her hair changes style and color constantly, as do her clothes. Her shadow never reflects her shape, and is tangible, like velvet. She is said to smell of sweat, late nights, sour wine, and old leather. Her sigil in the galleries of the other Endless is a multicolored, abstract swirl. Her realm is a chaotic, constantly changing mass of colors and strange objects and shapes, and contains a sundial with the inscription “Tempus Frangit” (“time breaks,” a Latin pun on the phrase “Tempus Fugit”, “time flees”.)

These Ladies work hard, the only type of cosplay I’ve ever done is on Halloween dressed as seigfried from soul calibre with a painted cardboard arm and sword, and here they look like they just stepped out from a surreal and somewhat scary other realm. So in ending, Geekdom is cool and we should all embrace it – just imagine a world were we could all dress up awesome everyday. It would be magical.

Peace out.

My distant dinorobosaur cousin, Grimlock.

My distant dinorobosaur cousin, Grimlock.

Dinorobosaur.

Oh, also – the pony that proves the rule.

"we are taking over your internets"

“we are taking over your internets”

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What has Five Giant Lion Heads and a Blazing Sword?

Hello and greetings young earth mammals.
After a brief hiatus, I return from the cyberverse with tidings of Voltron.
The cool Voltron, the one made up of five giant robot lion cats.

"I HAVE ROBOT LIONS FOR HANDS!!!!!!"

“I HAVE ROBOT LIONS FOR HANDS!!!!!!”

Why is he the cool Voltron?, because even though he has lasers and beams and a super duper energy sword of devastation, it simply comes down to the fact that his hands and feet have mouths instead of digits – he can bite you and punch you at the same time, and that is quite simply badass.
I was feeling somewhat nostalgic about this beautiful robot machine and decided to see what interesting tidbits I could find.

I wish I was this kid.

I wish I was this kid.

But first, a brief re-telling of how Voltron works.

Voltron is a gigantic robot that fights evil, a manwitch called Haggar split him into five lions somehow and scattered them across the planet Arus. An evil king Zarkon took advantage of this opportunity to be a dick, running around causing all sorts of trouble. There is a Galaxy Alliance that decides “oh no, we need Volrton back” and the send five of their best pilots out to find the scattered Voltron lions. Which they do, of course. The five lions connect togeter to form Voltron. Now, each epidoe is essentially the same: Haggar makes a RoBeast, sends it to Arus al angry like, the pilots hop in their lions, fight, start losing, form Voltron, start winning, start losing – the they bring out the Blazing Sword, slash the RoBeast causing it to explode, then win.

"Why don't we just use this form and sword from the beginning?"

“Why don’t we just use this form and sword from the beginning?”

Normally in shows where the cast wear particular color suits, these suits match the color of their owners machine/ride/robot, However in Voltron the colors were a little mixed up–Lance pilots the red lion, but wears a blue uniform; Keith pilots the black lion but wears red; Sven piloted the blue lion but wore black; the Princess pilots the blue lion but wears sort of a purple-and-pink uniform. Hunk and Pidge are the only ones whose uniform colors match the colors of their lions.

"Go go Voltron rangers, Mighty lion robot raaaannnngggeeeerrrrssss"

“Go go Voltron rangers, Mighty lion robot raaaannnngggeeeerrrrssss”

Originally Voltron aired in Japan as “Hundred Beast GoLion” which I think sounds just super.

Picture unrelated to previous comment.

Picture unrelated to previous comment.

There is a mouse Voltron, piloted by space mice.

Space MIIIIICE!!!!!

Space MIIIIICE!!!!!

There were a total of three “Voltrons”: Voltron I of the Near Universe was the “Vehicle Force”, and the “Lion Force” of the Far Universe was Voltron III. Voltron II, from the Middle Universe, featured three humanoid robots that combined into one multi-armed fighter; this version was never shown in the US (though toys based on this show were released)

I knew a kid who owned three of these Lions.  Three isn't enough - why didn't his parents love him more?

I knew a kid who owned three of these Lions. Three isn’t enough – why didn’t his parents love him more?

Best Voltron Moments caught on Video.

The material that made up the VOLTRON series consists of two unrelated shows originally from Japan — “Golion” (Lion Force) and “Dairugger XV” (Vehicle Force).

marketers "hey, instead of five robot lions - how about FIFTEEN vehicles? that will up our profits" Kids "New Voltron sucks"

Marketers “hey, instead of five robot lions – how about FIFTEEN vehicles? that will up our profits”
Kids “New Voltron sucks”

Well, that’s enough for now, Peace out.

Dinorobosaur.

Oh, also this exists.  Of course it does.

Ponies, Ponies EVERYWHERE!!!!

Ponies, Ponies EVERYWHERE!!!!

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Spiderman puts the Spider into Science.

Hello and salutations Tiny Manlings, first off today I want you all to google image ‘spiderman meme’ because its hilarious.

The classic non working pencil gag strikes again.

The classic non working pencil gag strikes again.

Secondly: Spider Science!!

Spider-Man might be a fictional superhero, but at least two of his tricks exist in the real world. Now, scientists have shown that it’s possible spin silk strong enough to stop a train, and are crafting a new super-sensory suit that warns its wearer when someone — or something — is approaching.

First, three graduate students decided to myth-bust a scene from the second Spider-Man movie. In it, Spider-Man slings webbing from the front of a four-car subway train and stops it from plummeting into a river. The team, from the University of Leicester in the U.K., calculated that some spider silk is, in fact, strong enough to stop a runaway train, and published their results in the most recent issue of Journal of Physics Special Topics.

"This seems feasible" - Science.

“This seems feasible” – Science.

First, the team calculated how much four R160 New York City subway cars — packed with a total of 984 people — would weigh (about 200,000 kilograms, or roughly 10 Atlas V rockets). Then, they calculated how fast the train was going (24 meters per second, or about 53 miles per hour) and how much resistance the track would have offered as it charged forward (negligible). From there, they could work out how much force the webbing would have needed to exert upon the train to stop it: about 300,000 Newtons, or about 12 times the amount of force exerted by a large American alligator as its jaws snap shut.

After considering the relative geometry of the train, webs, and buildings used to anchor the silk, the team calculated the amount of stiffness, or tensile strength, required to hold the train in place without snapping. That value is known as Young’s modulus, a measure of the stiffness in elastic materials, and works out to be 3.12 gigapascals (one Pascal = 1 Newton applied over a square meter).

Turns out, orb-weaving spiders produce silk that ranges in strength from 1.5 to 12 gigapascals — meaning that yes, Spider-Man could have stopped a moving train by flinging sticky silk at it. Coincidentally, the properties of the silk produced by Darwin’s Bark Spider (Caerostris darwini), an arachnid that lives in Madagascar and spins the largest webs observed (sometimes hanging from 25-meter long anchor threads), match those of the webbing Spider-Man deployed in this scene.

But it isn’t just Spider-Man’s silk that could be real. With the help of a new suit, the superhero’s ability to sense approaching people could also make the transition into reality. Victor Mateevitsi, a graduate student at the University of Illinois at Chicago, has built a suit that alerts its wearer to approaching humans. Called SpiderSense, the suit uses a suite of built-in microphones to sense the surrounding environment.

Your super hero suit could look better...

Your super hero suit could look better…

The microphones transmit high-frequency sound waves and monitor waves reflected by nearby objects. When a person or object approaches, the microphones can sense it, and they respond by producing pressure in the area of the suit closest to the object. Mateevitsi envisions using the technology to help the visually impaired, as well as cyclists dealing with road traffic.

Well once again we can thank comics for giving us some real life awesomness.  Thanks guys, we love you.

Peace out.

Dinorobosaur.

(I’m just going to leave these here)

I can't handle it!!!!!

I can’t handle it!!!!!

So courteous.

So courteous.

soon...

soon…

Seems as effective as a pair of glasses..

Seems as effective as a pair of glasses..

Once again, proof that the Ponies are taking over.

Once again, proof that the Ponies are taking over.

 

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True stories behind nursery rhymes

Hey there Simian creatures, Your youngling and/or hatchlings like to listen to, and read nursery rhymes.  These strange short poems confuse my cold blooded robo infused dino brain, So I sought out the meaning behind them.  What follows is more gritty than any hollywood reboot.

Humpty Dumpty

Humptey now sufffers from tallwallophobia

Humptey now sufffers from tallwallophobia

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall,
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall,
All the King’s Horses and all the King’s men
Couldn’t put Humpty together again.

In children’s books, Humpty Dumpty is portrayed as a large egg, usually dressed like a little boy. It’s a sad story, as he gets busted up and nobody can fix him. However, the real story behind the rhyme dates back to the English Civil War. Humpty was a huge cannon mounted atop a high wall-like church tower. During the Siege of Colchester, The tower was hit by enemy cannon fire and Humpty suffered a great fall. There was no fixing the cannon or the tower, and the Humpty Dumpty rhyme was born.

Help me horses!, you are my only hope.

Help me horses!, you are my only hope.

Ring Around The Rosie

Wheeeeee fun!

Wheeeeee fun!

Ring around the rosy
A pocketful of posies
“Ashes, Ashes”
We all fall down!

This rhyme dates back to the Great Plague of London in 1665. The symptoms of bubonic plague included a rosy red ring-shaped rash, which inspired the first line. It was believed that the disease was carried by bad smells, so people frequently carried pockets full of fresh herbs, or “posies.” The “ashes, ashes” line is believed to refer to the cremation of the bodies of those who died from the plague.

No Fun For You!!

No Fun For You!!

Baa Baa Blacksheep

"Oh my god a talking sheep!"

“Oh my god a talking sheep!”

Baa baa black sheep, have you any wool?
Yes sir, yes sir, three bags full!
One for the master, one for the dame
And one for the little boy who lives down the lane

Baa Baa Black Sheep references the importance of the wool industry to the economy from the Middle Ages until the nineteenth century. The rhyme is also thought to be a political satire of the export tax imposed in Britain in 1275 under the rule of King Edward I.

Moar Taxes!

Moar Taxes!

For Want of a Nail

 

The Chaos Effect Nail.

The Chaos Effect Nail.

For want of a nail the shoe was lost
For want of a shoe the horse was lost
For want of a horse the rider was lost
For want of a rider the battle was lost
For want of a battle the kingdom was lost
And all for the want of a horseshoe nail

This simple rhyme is a reminder for children to think of the possible consequences of their actions. It has often been used to illustrate the chain of events that can stem from a single thoughtless action.

It's a vicious chain.

It’s a vicious chain.

Mary, Mary Quite Contrary

It's just a garden my friends...

It’s just a garden my friends…

Mary Mary quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?
With silver bells and cockle shells
And pretty maids all in a row

This rhyme is a reference to Bloody Mary. The garden refers to growing cemeteries, as she filled them with Protestants. Silver bells and cockle shells were instruments of torture and the maiden was a device used to behead people.

... A GARDEN OF MURDER!!

… A GARDEN OF MURDER!!

Goosey, Goosey Gander

"I wander where I want" The Goose.

“I wander where I want” The Goose.

Goosey, goosey, gander,
Whither dost thou wander?
Upstairs and downstairs
And in my lady’s chamber.

There I met an old man
Who wouldn’t say his prayers;
I took him by the left leg,
And threw him down the stairs

While Mother Goose seems like a kind, grandmotherly sort, the gander in this rhyme appears to be quite a bastard. This sixteenth century rhyme is a reminder to children to always say their prayers.

Pray that the Goose won't get you.

Pray that the Goose won’t get you.

It’s Raining, It’s Pouring

I can't really think of a caption here.  I mean, it's just raining and pouring.

I can’t really think of a caption here. I mean, it’s just raining and pouring.

It’s raining, it’s pouring
The old man is snoring
He went to bed and he bumped his head
And couldn’t get up in the morning

In this strange nursery rhyme, the man apparently was careless in going to bed and didn’t wake up. We can only assume it’s a message to be cautious when you’re on your way to bed.

CAUTIOUS OF MONSTERS!!

CAUTIOUS OF MONSTERS!!

Rock-a-Bye, Baby

Baby looks damn terrified to me.

Baby looks damn terrified to me.

Rock-a-bye, baby,
In the tree top.
When the wind blows,
The cradle will rock.
When the bough breaks,
The cradle will fall,
And down will come baby,
Cradle and al

The American roots of this odd rhyme come from a young pilgrim who saw Native American mothers hanging cradles in trees. When the wind blew, the cradles would rock and the babies in them would sleep.

Sway my baby, sway like an eagle.

Sway my baby, sway like an eagle.

Peter, Peter, Pumpkin Eater

"Nom nom nom" Peter.

“Nom nom nom” Peter.

Peter , Peter , pumpkin-eater,
Had a wife and couldn’t keep her;
He put her in a pumpkin shell,
And there he kept her very well

This nursery rhyme also has it’s roots in America, unlike most that started in England. It was a different time back then for women, and for views on divorce, too, which is why this rhyme served to warn young girls about infidelity. Peter’s wife was supposedly a harlot, and Peter’s remedy for the situation was to kill her and hide her body in a giant pumpkin shell.

PETER WHAT HAVE YOU DONE??

PETER WHAT HAVE YOU DONE??

Sing a Song of Sixpence

Mmmmmm, Pie.

Mmmmmm, Pie.

Sing a song of sixpence a pocket full of rye,
Four and twenty blackbirds baked in a pie.
When the pie was opened the birds began to sing,
Oh wasn’t that a dainty dish to set before the king?

This rhyme most certainly originated long ago, before PETA existed. It was likely based on a spoof by a court jester who thought it would be hilarious to trick the king by putting live birds into a pie shell. At the time, cooked blackbirds were considered a delicacy and would have been served to the king.

"Dafuq is this?" every surprised king ever..

“Dafuq is this?” every surprised king ever..

Jack and Jill

I can see Hollywood making this into a terrible movie starring Adam Sandler and Adam Sandler.

I can see Hollywood making this into a terrible movie starring Adam Sandler and Adam Sandler.

Jack and Jill went up the hill,
To fetch a pail of water.
Jack fell down,
And broke his crown;
And Jill came tumbling after.

This poem originated in France. The characters refer to King Louis XVI, Jack, and his Queen Marie Antoinette, Jill. Jack was beheaded (lost his crown) first, then Jill came tumbling after during the Reign of Terror in 1793.

What a Twist!!!!

What a Twist!!!!

You Humans are such macabre and disturbing wee creatures…

Peace out for now.

Dinorobosaur.

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Akira, the bombdiggiest of them all.

Dear Delightful wee homosapiens, Today I’m talking about Akira – I love it, and you should too.  To share the love of this groundbreaking (at the time) manga, I’ve tracked down some interesting factoids for you all to enjoy.

Best Poster Ever.

Best Poster Ever.

1- Akira was inspired by Bonnie and Clyde
Born in 1954, Otomo was no stranger to Western film, in particular movies that revolved around the rebel figure. He was in his teens when two of his bigger inspirations were released, and one can see the influence of these movies on Otomo and Akira merely by examining their taglines: “The strangest damned gang you ever heard of” comes from 1967’s Bonnie and Clyde and “He rode the fast lane on the road to nowhere” harkens from 1970’s Five Easy Pieces.

These films influenced Otomo’s thematic sense and his unique illustration style. His attention to giving his characters somewhat realistic anatomy, including facial features, is sometimes at odds with the typical manga (the Japanese term for comics) style, but it helped set Otomo apart from others and gave him an instantly recognizable and signature style.

What a rebel.

What a rebel.

2- Akira was the biggest grossing film of the year.
Akira required over 2,200 shots, 160,000 single pictures and 327 different colors (a good 50 of them created for the film), which might help explain the film’s record-setting production budget for Japanese animation of 1.1 billion Yen (about $8.5 million in 1988). Also, much of the film takes place at night, which calls for higher color requirements.

Fortunately for Otomo, Akira, with its nerve-touching themes of youth alienation, government corruption and the struggle for power (along with a heavy dose of violence and even some nudity) proved a smash success at the box office, earning 6.3 billion Yen in Japan ($49 million) and another $500,000 at U.S. box offices.

Violence to the FACE.

Violence to the FACE.

3- Akira was a 2,000-page comic book.
Akira began in 1982 as a manga that appeared in publication in Young Magazine, a rag similar to that of Mad magazine in the U.S.

Issue One of Awesome.

Issue One of Awesome.

It would ultimately run until the summer of 1990, running in excess of 2,000 pages, every one of which Otomo wrote and illustrated by hand. Japanese publisher Kodansha released it in six volumes, and it was published in the U.S. on two occasions with two different translations: first in 1988 by Epic Comics in 38 issues and again in 2000 by Dark Horse Comics, the latter time as trade paperbacks.

In this issue, Tetsuo took a plane to the face.  It made him angry.

In this issue, Tetsuo took a plane to the face. It made him angry.

4- Akira gave rise to real-world technology.
Great science fiction has a way of imagining and engendering technology that didn’t exist before, and Akira is no exception.

The Akira manga was, like most Japanese mangas, originally done using only black and white. Its first Western translation, colored by Steve Oliff for Epic Comics, pioneered the use of digital coloring and became the first digitally colored comic (a process that is an industry standard today). Oliff achieved the feat in 1988 with a program called Pixelcraft, working on an IBM 286 12mhz computer; the effort won him the 1989 Harvey Award (presented for achievement in comic books) for best color.

Dat sweet bike is real now.

Dat sweet bike is real now.

Moving to the street, the immense popularity of Kaneda’s unique ”feet first” motorcycle has also prompted the creation of a few reproductions of that bike, although the majority of them were not functional. At least one exception was shown at the 2004 Tokyo Motorcycle Show, and more than a few fans would love to see it go into production.

5- Akira was the West’s big introduction to anime.
Animation in Japan goes back at least a century, back to a three-second clip produced in 1907 that featured a kid in a sailor’s suit writing the words “Moving Pictures” before he faced the audience, removed his cap and saluted. The art form became propaganda during the World War II; then, during U.S. occupation, it was heavily influenced by Disney.

"WATCH MORE ANIME OR SHIT WILL GO DOWN" - Tetsuo Shima.

“WATCH MORE ANIME OR SHIT WILL GO DOWN” – Tetsuo Shima.

Anime’s first true introduction in the West can probably be traced to 1967’s Speed Racer, but other examples are few and far between until Akira hit Western shores. For many, the film was their first exposure to anime, and the movie is often credited as being almost exclusively responsible for the huge Western anime boom of the ‘90s.

While interest has cooled slightly since then, one can still see plenty of recent examples of anime’s Western popularity, including the massive Pokemon franchise as well as Nickelodeon’s Avatar: The Last Airbender.

I was introduced to Akira when I was 13, first the anime and then the much more amazing manga comics.  IT BLEW MY MIND!!!

Pictured: MIND BLOWN!!!

Pictured: MIND BLOWN!!!

Thanks for reading, I hope I have sparked an interest – in farewell let me share with you some beautiful fan art and what not.

Peace out.

Dinorobosaur.

AH THIS MAKES ME GIGGLE LIKE A SCHOOLGIRL.

AH THIS MAKES ME GIGGLE LIKE A SCHOOLGIRL.

This is twelve shades of cool.

This is twelve shades of cool.

"Rgrgrgrgghhgragh"

“Rgrgrgrgghhgragh”

Simple but good.

Simple but good.

Bloop.

Bloop.

Cool as.

Cool as.

Mean.

Mean.

I am starting to believe that Ponies will take over the world.

I am starting to believe that Ponies will take over the world.

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